Patronage ‘Zines

This project, which I thought would be fun for the design students in the class, turned out to be really very challenging. Not only is patronage research for the High Middle Ages more difficult than many of the students were ready to face, but it turns out that laying out even a small magazine is incredibly frustrating, especially if students don’t have access to advanced publishing apps.

Prompt:

Patronage – who commissions, pays for, and buys – works of art is probably at least as important a factor in the art history of the Middle Ages as artistic identities, and we tend to have a lot more information about patrons than about artists . In this assignment, you will investigate a patron and the works of art securely (or more tendentiously) associated with them. You can choose a patron (male, female, or corporate) from the list below, or you can propose one of your own. You will identify no fewer than three works associated with the patron, extant or recorded (that is, no longer extant, but known to have existed). If the works are no longer extant, you will find similar works that may give some sense of what the lost works looked like, or reconstructions of those lost works. If there is only one manuscript or object associated with a patron, you can use three images from the same manuscript or three distinct parts of the object.

You will prepare a mini-exhibition-catalog with the following elements

  1. A brief biographical/historical sketch of the patron (about 250 words)
  2. Images of the works you have chosen to discuss in relationship to this patron, with full captions
  3. Short interpretive texts on each of the works (between 200 and 400 words each)
  4. A list of suggested further readings (selected bibliography)

The final product will take the form of a booklet or magazine, printed in color. You will need to turn in both the printed hard-copy and a pdf with the formatted document. 

Take note that formatting should be the LAST phase of the work – generate your content first, then format. I will go over formatting tips in class, but basically, my advice is to use some kind of a template in Word unless you are an experienced graphic designer and comfortable with an application like InDesign. I always find it helpful to make a hard-copy mockup just with some blank paper and a pencil or pen, so that I’ll get all the content on the right pages before I hit “print.”

Here are some helpful websites with instructions on how to make a booklet in Word:

Official microsoft instructions: https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Create-a-booklet-or-book-dfd94694-fa4f-4c71-a1c7-737c31539e4a (Links to an external site.)How to video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YR9BM3iDeuA (Links to an external site.)

Some free templates:

https://templates.office.com/en-us/Booklet-TM04009678 

http://nuonis.com/book-templates/ 

Rubric

Text: content

The information in the text is substantive, historically correct. A clear interpretive point-of-view is evident.
This area will be used by the assessor to leave comments related to this criterion.
10.0 pts

Text: form

Grammar, spelling, and syntax are correct and consistent throughout. Tone is appropriate.
This area will be used by the assessor to leave comments related to this criterion.
5.0 pts

Images

Images are of acceptable quality and identified by full captions
This area will be used by the assessor to leave comments related to this criterion.
5.0 pts

Production values

The layout, flow, and organization of the booklet is clear and not cluttered; fonts are harmonious and legible; visually pleasing design
This area will be used by the assessor to leave comments related to this criterion.
5.0 pts

Selected bibliography

Contains at least 4 scholarly (peer-reviewed) works
This area will be used by the assessor to leave comments related to this criterion.
5.0 pts

On time

Full credit for on time: 20% deduction for every day late
This area will be used by the assessor to leave comments related to this criterion.
10.0 pts

Alli Lundell, Matilda of Scotland

Lydia Tullis, Emma and Cnut

Amber Utterback, Abbesses of Essen

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